Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Wrap-Around Photo for Cover of Revised/Expanded Atlantis Book

A Winged Bull from Susa

EXPANDED BOOK ON ATLANTIS SOON TO BE RELEASED


I've decided to insert all my other mythological and archaeoastronomical essays into this work.  Should have it ready for purchase in a week or two and I will, as always, post the relevant Amazon link. 

Here is the list of added essays:

MATWIL AND THE GODS OF PALENQUE

KUMME, SHRINE OF THE HURRIAN STORM-GOD TESHUB: A LOCATION ADJACENT TO A “MONSTER” VOLCANO?

THE STONE ONES OF URSHANABI’S BOAT

THE PUKKU AND MIKKU OF GILGAMESH

THE NAZCA LINES COSMOGRAM: A SPIDER AT THE CENTER OF IT ALL

THE LOCH NESS MONSTER IN ADOMNAN’S LIFE OF ST. COLUMBA: A CASE FOR A PINNIPED

THE LE MENEC ALIGNMENT AT CARNAC, BRITTANY

THE FOUNDATION OF GOBEKLI TEPE AND THE CYGNUS SUPERNOVA

The revised title will be: 

A NEW THEORY ON ATLANTIS:
ATALANTE AND THE PERSIAN EMPIRE
With Other Essays on Mythology and Archaeoastronomy

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

OTHER "ESOTERIC" ARTICLES ON THE ATLANTIS BLOG

In addition to making the entire book on Atlantis available here:

https://newatlantistheory.blogspot.com/

In the same place I've made available all my other articles that seek to provide new interpretations of various ancient sacred monuments.  A list of these follows...


Monday, February 19, 2018

MY ARTHURIAN BOOKS

https://www.amazon.com/Mysteries-Avalon-Primer-Arthurian-Druidism/dp/1463691939/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1519089329&sr=8-1&keywords=the+mysteries+of+avalon+august+hunt



https://www.amazon.com/Arthur-History-Reinterpretation-Evidence/dp/1463666616/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1519089360&sr=1-1&keywords=the+arthur+of+history+august+hunt



https://www.amazon.com/Bear-King-Arthur-Southern-England/dp/1548982954/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1519089389&sr=1-1&keywords=the+bear+king+august+hunt

NOTE: Revised paperback will be available in a day or two for $12.99. 

MY NON-ARTHURIAN BOOKS (INCLUDING MY ONE AND ONLY NOVEL)

https://www.amazon.com/Terrible-Ones-Horse-Revealing-Secrets/dp/1480087033/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1519088941&sr=8-1&keywords=the+terrible+one%27s+horse+august+hunt



https://www.amazon.com/New-Theory-Atlantis-Atalante-Persian/dp/1494977362/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1519088998&sr=1-1&keywords=a+new+theory+on+atlantis+august+hunt



https://www.amazon.com/Real-Moses-His-God/dp/1463694350/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1519089045&sr=1-1&keywords=the+real+moses+and+his+god+august+hunt



https://www.amazon.com/Christ-Revelation-Decoding-Testament-Symbolism/dp/1494962659/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1519089088&sr=1-1&keywords=christ+and+revelation+august+hunt



https://www.amazon.com/Rending-August-Hunt/dp/1533583099/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1519089138&sr=1-1&keywords=the+rending+august+hunt

Friday, February 16, 2018

ARTHUR'S BASE OF OPERATIONS?

Gewessei Battles from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

I've been asked where I thought Arthur's actual "base of operations" might be located.  As my regular readers probably know, I've flirted with different sites in the past.  A favorite has been Barbury Castle, the 'Bear's Fort', near the Liddington Badbury and Nythe Farm/Durocornovium.

However, knowing as I do now that Arthur - Ceredig son of Cunedda, whose own kingdom was in western Wales and who was quite probably buried at Viroconium/Wroxeter in central Wales, I don't really find it necessary to "chase" after another court or capital.  

This is especially true given the layout of the Arthurian battles.  When we read the account if these battles in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, it is plainly stated - and otherwise fairly evident - that the three directions of attack followed major river systems.  Cerdic and his son Cynric (= Cunorix son of Cunedda/Maquicoline) are said to have landed in ships.  

As we re dealing with the actions of mercenaries or foederati, all of whom originated elsewhere, the search for a "headquarters" seems unwarranted.  While battlefield logistics are a major concern to any military force, if supplies are ship-born there is no need for a local or proximate depot.  

Certainly, pre-existing or refortified camps that offered at least temporary protection or positions of power may well have been secured.  And we are told that cities were taken as a result of decisive victories.  But it does not follow that Ceredig could be said to "rule" from any of these, nor that he held "court" there.  His home lay in western Wales and if we must have an Arthurian center, it can only have been the headland fort at Aberarth on the Afon Arth in his kingdom of Ceredigion.  

The precise relationship of the Gewissei with Viroconium is difficult to determine.  I've discussed some possibilities in my new book THE BEAR KING: ARTHUR AND THE IRISH IN WALES AND SOUTHERN ENGLAND.  To draw a rather simplistic parallel, we might consider Ceredigion's association with Viroconium to be much like that of the Roman period socii with Rome.  

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

ARTHUR'S BURIAL PLACE ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF THE ROMAN CEMETERY AT VIROCONIUM/WROXETER

Fig. 1
Fig. 2

Fig. 3
Estimated Findspot for the Cunorix Stone

Fig. 4
Zoomed View of Cunorix Stone Findspot

For years now, I've maintained that the Cunorix Stone found at Wroxeter/Viroconium represents not only the son of Cunedda/Maquicoline, but the Gewissei chieftain Cynric, mistakenly called the son of Cerdic (= Ceredig son of Cunedda/Arthur) in the ANGLO-SAXON CHRONICLE.  The Gewissei were Irish or Hiberno-British foederati fighting for the Welsh High King against other Britons.  They had allied themselves with the English for military actions in southern England.  

Cunorix/Cynric is known in the early Welsh sources as Cynyr, and he is wrongly made the son of Gwron son of Cunedda.  From P. C. Bartram's A CLASSICAL WELSH DICTIONARY:

"GWRON ap CUNEDDA WLEDIG. (Legendary). (420)

He appears in the legends of Anglesey as the father of Cynyr, Meilir and Yneigr who aided their
cousin Cadwallon Lawhir in expelling the Gwyddyl from the island. The story occurs in the expanded ‘Hanesyn Hen’ tract (ByA §29(15) in EWGT pp.92-93). See s.nn. Cadwallon Lawhir and Meilir Meilirion.

Gwron is not mentioned in the older lists of the sons of Cunedda and therefore his historical existence is doubtful. He might, perhaps, have been too young to take part in the conquests which the other sons of Cunedda are supposed to have made. Another suggestion is that his name Gwron, ‘hero’ is really a cognomen and that he is actually to be identified with Ysfael (q.v.) ap Cunedda, who gave his name to a part of Anglesey and presumably ruled there. This was suggested by Owen Rhoscomyl." 

Gwron as a heroic epithet here must have belonged either to Cynyr himself or to his real father, Cunedda.

According to Professor Roger White, an archaeologist at The Universirty of Birmingham who carried out field work at Wroxeter, 

"No plan was made of the [Cunorix Stone] findspot – it was recovered by the farmer and reported by Dr John Houghton. Houghton took the earliest photos of it showing the fresh ploughmarks on it. My best estimate of the find spot is likely to be the field immediately south and east of Watling Street as it comes into the city on its north-east corner. This was the location, on both sides of the road, of the Wroxeter eastern cemetery. The best plan of this can be found in the this article: H. Johnson ‘The excavations at the cemetery, Uriconium’ Gentleman’s Magazine 132:1 (1862), 398-405." [For which see Figure 2 above]

The following Website (which has a thorough bibliography on sources of information for the stone) gives some important additional details on the findspot:


"Description: A tombstone was ploughed up just outside the town defences, 35-40 yards (35-40m) south of the Horseshoe Lane. <1>

CMHTS Comment:- Note that the earliest accounts [<3>,<4>] give the findspot as being inside the town wall. This is incorrect. The stone is, in effect, an outlier of the Middle Crows Green Cemetery. <2>

Houghton's account mentions the tombstone. <3>

The inscription, dated to about 460-475 was cut on an earlier tombstone which had been re-used as a part of a building. <4>

CMHTS Comment:- This find lies outside defined post-Roman/early medieval urban area (cf. PRN 06495). <5>"

As Cunorix/Cynyr/Cynric was deemed important enough to have been given a memorial stone outside Viriconium, the presumed capital of the Welsh High King, it stands to reason that his even more impressive brother, Ceredig, would have been afforded a similar honor.  If so, his stone - assuming it survived the combined destructive energies of Nature and Man - is even now lying under the turf in this same burial ground.  

What would its inscription read, I wonder?  Would it say merely Ceredig son of Maquicoline?  Or would we find chiseled into the stone Ceredig's more famous appellation, Artorius?